Sunday, December 5, 2010

B.E. AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING SEMESTER 6 - 8 ANNA UNIVERSITY CHENNAI : : CHENNAI - 600 025 REGULATION 2008 - CURRICULUM

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ANNA UNIVERSITY CHENNAI : : CHENNAI - 600 025
REGULATION 2008 - CURRICULUM
B.E. AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING
AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS
SEMESTER VI
(Applicable to the students admitted from the Academic year 2008 – 2009 onwards)
Code No. Course Title L T P C
THEORY
MG2351 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3
AE2351 Finite Element Method 3 0 0 3
AE2352 Experimental Stress Analysis 3 0 0 3
AE2353 Wind Tunnel Techniques 3 0 0 3
AE2354 High temperature materials 3 0 0 3
Elective – I 3 0 0 4
PRACTICAL
AE2355 Aero Engine Laboratory 0 0 3 2
AE2356 Aircraft Design Project - I 0 0 3 2
AE2357 Airframe Laboratory 0 0 3 2
TOTAL 18 0 9 25
SEMESTER VII
Code No. Course Title L T P C
THEORY
GE2022 Total Quality Management 3 0 0 3
AE2401 Avionics 3 0 0 3
AE2402 Computational Fluid Dynamics 3 0 0 3
AE2403 Vibrations And Elements of Aero elasticity 3 0 0 3
Elective – II 3 0 0 3
Elective – III 3 0 0 3
PRACTICAL
AE2404 Aircraft Design Project - II 0 0 3 2
AE2405 Aircraft Systems Laboratory 0 0 3 2
AE2406 Avionics Laboratory 0 0 3 2
AE2407 Identification of Project Work 0 0 2 1
TOTAL 18 0 11 25
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SEMESTER VIII
Code No. Course Title L T P C
THEORY
AE2451 Composite Materials And Structures 3 0 0 3
Elective – IV 3 0 0 3
Elective – V 3 0 0 3
PRACTICAL
AE2452 Comprehension And Technical Seminar 0 0 3 2
AE2453 Project Work 0 0 12 6
TOTAL 9 0 15 17
LIST OF ELECTIVE COURSES
Elective – I
Code No. Course Title L T P C
AE2021 Theory of Elasticity 3 0 0 3
AE2022 Aircraft General Engineering And Maintenance
Practices 3 0 0 3
AE2023 Space Mechanics 3 0 0 3
AE2024 Heat Transfer 3 0 0 3
Electives– II & III
Code No. Course Title L T P C
AE2025 Helicopter Theory 3 0 0 3
AE2026 Industrial Aerodynamics 3 0 0 3
AE2027 Airframe Maintenance and Repair 3 0 0 3
AE2028 Aero Engine Maintenance and Repair 3 0 0 3
AE2029 Theory of Plates and Shells 3 0 0 3
AE2030 Fatigue And Fracture 3 0 0 3
Electives – IV & V
Code No. Course Title L T P C
AE2031 Hypersonic Aerodynamics 3 0 0 3
AE2032 Experimental Aerodynamics 3 0 0 3
AE2033 Rockets and Missiles 3 0 0 3
AE2034 Structural Dynamics 3 0 0 3
AE2035 Air Traffic Control and Planning 3 0 0 3
AE2036 Production Planning And Control 3 0 0 3
AE2037 Engine Systems And Controls 3 0 0 3
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MG2351 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT L T P C
(Common to all Branches) 3 0 0 3
UNIT I OVERVIEW OF MANAGEMENT 9
Definition - Management - Role of managers - Evolution of Management thought -
Organization and the environmental factors – Trends and Challenges of Management in
Global Scenario.
UNIT II PLANNING 9
Nature and purpose of planning - Planning process - Types of plans – Objectives - -
Managing by objective (MBO) Strategies - Types of strategies - Policies - Decision
Making - Types of decision - Decision Making Process - Rational Decision Making
Process - Decision Making under different conditions.
UNIT III ORGANIZING 9
Nature and purpose of organizing - Organization structure - Formal and informal groups I
organization - Line and Staff authority - Departmentation - Span of control -
Centralization and Decentralization - Delegation of authority - Staffing - Selection and
Recruitment - Orientation - Career Development - Career stages – Training - -
Performance Appraisal.
UNIT IV DIRECTING 9
Creativity and Innovation - Motivation and Satisfaction - Motivation Theories -
Leadership Styles - Leadership theories - Communication - Barriers to effective
communication - Organization Culture - Elements and types of culture - Managing
cultural diversity.
UNIT V CONTROLLING 9
Process of controlling - Types of control - Budgetary and non-budgetary control
techniques - Managing Productivity - Cost Control - Purchase Control - Maintenance
Control - Quality Control - Planning operations.
TOTAL= 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Stephen P. Robbins and Mary Coulter, 'Management', Prentice Hall of India,
8th edition.
2. Charles W L Hill, Steven L McShane, 'Principles of Management', Mcgraw Hill
Education, Special Indian Edition, 2007.
REFERENCES:
1. Hellriegel, Slocum & Jackson, ' Management - A Competency Based Approach',
Thomson South Western, 10th edition, 2007.
2. Harold Koontz, Heinz Weihrich and Mark V Cannice, 'Management - A global
& Entrepreneurial Perspective', Tata Mcgraw Hill, 12th edition, 2007.
3. Andrew J. Dubrin, 'Essentials of Management', Thomson Southwestern, 7th
edition, 2007.
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AE2351 FINITE ELEMENT METHOD L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To introduce the concept of numerical analysis of structural components
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 4
Review of basic approximate methods of analyses – Stiffness and Flexibility matrix for
simple cases – Governing equation and convergence criteria of finite element method.
UNIT II DISCRETE ELEMENTS 12
Bar, Frame, beam elements – Application to static, dynamic and stability analysis.
UNIT III CONTINUUM ELEMENTS 10
Various types of 2-D-elements Application to plane stress, plane strain and axisymmetric
problems.
UNIT IV ISOPARAMETRIC ELEMENTS 10
Applications to two and three-dimensional problems.
UNIT V FIELD PROBLEM 9
Applications to other field problems like heat transfer and fluid flow.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Tirupathi.R.C and Ashok D.B, “Introduction to Finite Elements in Engineering”,
Prentice Hall India, Third Edition, 2003.
REFERENCES
1. Reddy J.N. “An Introduction to Finite Element Method”, McGraw-Hill, 2000.
2. Krishnamurthy, C.S., “Finite Element Analysis”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2000.
3. Bathe, K.J. and Wilson, E.L., “Numerical Methods in Finite Elements Analysis”,
Prentice Hall of India, 1985.
AE2352 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To bring awareness on experimental method of finding the response of the structure to
different types of load.
UNIT I MEASUREMENTS & EXTENSOMETER 10
Principles of measurements, Accuracy, Sensitivity and range of measurements.
Mechanical, Optical Acoustical and Electrical extensometers and their uses, Advantages
and disadvantages.
UNIT II ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE STRAIN GAUGES 10
Principle of operation and requirements, Types and their uses, Materials for strain
gauge. Calibration and temperature compensation, cross sensitivity, Rosette analysis,
Wheastone bridge and potentiometer circuits for static and dynamic strain
measurements, strain indicators.
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UNIT III PHOTOELASTICITY 10
Two dimensional photo elasticity, Concept of light – photoelastic effects, stress optic law,
Interpretation of fringe pattern, Compensation and separation techniques, Photo elastic
materials. Introduction to three dimensional photo elasticity.
UNIT IV BRITTLE COATING AND MOIRE METHODS 8
Introduction to Moire techniques, brittle coating methods and holography.
UNIT V NON – DESTRUCTIVE TESTING 7
Fundamentals of NDT,Radiography, ultrasonic, magnetic particle inspection, Fluorescent
penetrant technique, Eddy current testing, Acoustic Emission Technique.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Srinath, L.S., Raghava, M.R., Lingaiah, K., Garagesha, G., Pant B., and
Ramachandra, K., “Experimental Stress Analysis”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi,
1984.
REFERENCES
1. Dally, J.W., and Riley, W.F., “Experimental Stress Analysis”, McGraw-Hill Inc., New
York, 2005, IV edition.
2. Hetyenyi, M., “Hand book of Experimental Stress Analysis”, John Wiley and Sons
Inc., New York, 1972.
3. Pollock A.A., “Acoustic Emission in Acoustics and Vibration Progress”, Ed. Stephens
R.W.B., Chapman and Hall, 1993
AE2353 WIND TUNNEL TECHNIQUES L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To introduce the basic concepts of measurement of forces and moments on models
during the wind tunnel testing.
UNIT I WIND TUNNELS 10
Classification –non-dimensional numbers-types of similarities - Layout of open circuit
and closed circuit subsonic wind tunnels – design parameters-energy ratio - HP
calculations. Calibration.
UNIT II HIGH SPEED WIND TUNNELS 10
Blow down, in draft and induction tunnel layouts and their design features, Transonic,
supersonic and hypersonic tunnels, their peculiarities and calibration. Helium and gun
tunnels, Shock tubes,
UNIT III WIND TUNNEL MEASUREMENTS 12
Pressure,velocity and temperature measurements – Force measurements – types of
balances-Three component and six component balances – calibration of measuring
instruments.
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UNIT IV FLOW VISUALIZATION 6
Smoke and Tuft grid techniques – Dye injection special techniques – Optical methods of
flow visualization.
UNIT V NON-INTRUSIVE FLOW DIAGNOSTICS 7
Laser – Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry. Laser induced fluorescence.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Rae, W.H. and Pope, A. “Low Speed Wind Tunnel Testing”, John Wiley Publication,
1984.
REFERENCE
1. Pope, A., and Goin, L., “High Speed wind Tunnel Testing”, John Wiley, 1985.
AE2354 HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To learn damage mechanism and failure of components of elevated temperatures
UNIT I CREEP 9
Factors influencing functional life of components at elevated temperatures, definition of
creep curve, various stages of creep, metallurgical factors influencing various stages,
effect of stress, temperature and strain rate.
UNIT II DESIGN FOR CREEP RESISTANCE 9
Design of transient creep time, hardening, strain hardening, expressions of rupture life of
creep, ductile and brittle materials, Monkman-Grant relationship.
UNIT III FRACTURE 9
Various types of fracture, brittle to ductile from low temperature to high temperature,
cleavage fracture, ductile fracture due to micro void coalescence-diffusion controlled
void growth; fracture maps for different alloys and oxides.
UNIT IV OXIDATION AND HOT CORROSION 9
Oxidation, Pilling, Bedworth ratio, kinetic laws of oxidation- defect structure and control
of oxidation by alloy additions, hot gas corrosion deposit, modified hot gas corrosion,
fluxing mechanisms, effect of alloying elements on hot corrosion, interaction of hot
corrosion and creep, methods of combat hot corrosion.
UNIT V SUPERALLOYS AND OTHER MATERIALS 9
Iron base, Nickel base and Cobalt base super alloys, composition control, solid solution
strengthening, precipitation hardening by gamma prime, grain boundary strengthening,
TCP phase, embrittlement, solidification of single crystals, Intermetallics, high
temperature ceramics.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
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TEXT BOOKS
1. Raj. R., “Flow and Fracture at Elevated Temperatures”, American Society for Metals,
USA, 1985.
2. Hertzberg R. W., “Deformation and Fracture Mechanics of Engineering materials”, 4th
Edition, John Wiley, USA, 1996.
3. Courtney T.H, “Mechanical Behavior of Materials”, McGraw-Hill, USA, 1990.
REFERENCES
1. Boyle J.T, Spencer J, “Stress Analysis for Creep”, Butterworths, UK, 1983.
2. Bressers. J., “Creep and Fatigue in High Temperature Alloys”, Applied Science, 1981.
3. McLean D., “Directionally Solidified Materials for High Temperature Service”, The
Metals Society, USA, 1985.
AE2355 AERO ENGINE LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
To introduce the knowledge of the maintenance and repair of both piston and jet aero
engines and the procedures followed for overhaul of aero engines.
1. Dismantling of a piston engine
2. Engine (Piston Engine) - cleaning, visual inspection, NDT checks.
3. Piston Engine Components - dimensional checks.
4. Study of carburetor.
5. Piston – Engine reassembly.
6. Dismantling of a jet engine
7. Jet Engine – identification of components & defects.
8. Jet Engine – NDT checks and dimensional checks
9. Jet Engine – reassembly.
10. Engine starting procedures.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 30 students)
Sl.No
Equipments Qty Experiments No.
1 Piston Engines 1 1,2,3,4,5
2 Jet Aero Engines 1 6,7,8,9,10
3 Standard tools for dismantling and assembly 2 sets 1,5,6,10
4
Precision instruments (Vernier Caliper,
Micro meter, Cylinder bore gauge, depth
gauge, Bevel Protector and DTI
2 sets 3,5,8
5 NDT Equipment 1 set 2,8
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AE2356 AIRCRAFT DESIGN PROJECT – I L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
To introduce and develop the basic concept of aircraft design.
Each student is assigned the design of an Airplane (or Helicopter or any other flight
vehicle), for given preliminary specifications. The following are the assignments to be
carried out:
EXPERIMENTS
1. Comparative configuration study of different types of airplanes
2. Comparative study on specification and performance details of aircraft
3. Preparation of comparative data sheets
4. Work sheet layout procedures
5. Comparative graphs preparation and selection of main parameters for the design
6. Preliminary weight estimations, selection of main parameters,
7. Power plant selection, Aerofoil selection, Wing tail and control surfaces
8. Preparation of layouts of balance diagram and three view drawings
9. Drag estimation
10. Detailed performance calculations and stability estimates
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 30 students)
Sl.No. Name of the Equipment Quantity
1 Engineering Drawing Board 30
2 Engineering Drawing Instruments 30
3. Computers with suitable software 30
AE2357 AIRFRAME LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
To give training on riveting, patchwork, welding and carpentry
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
Aircraft wood gluing-single scarf joint
Aircraft wood gluing-double scarf joint
Study on MIG, TIG & PLASMA welding of aircraft components
Welded single & double V-joints.
Fabric Patch repair
Riveted patch repairs.
Tube bending and flaring
Sheet metal forming.
Preparation of glass epoxy of composite laminates and specimens.
Determination of elastic constants of composite specimens.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
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LIST OF EQUIPMENT
(for a batch of 30 students)
Sl.No. Name of the Equipment Quantity Experiment
No.
1 Shear cutter pedestal type 1 4,6
2 Drilling Machine 1 4,5,6
3 Bench Vices 1 1, 2, 6, 7, 8
4 Radius Bend bars 1 7
5 Pipe Flaring Tools 1 7
6 Welding machine 1 4
7 Glass fibre, epoxy resin 1 9
8 Strain gauges and strain indicator 1 10
GE2022 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT L T P C
(Common to all branches) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
 To understand the Total Quality Management concept and principles and the various
tools available to achieve Total Quality Management.
 To understand the statistical approach for quality control.
 To create an awareness about the ISO and QS certification process and its need for
the industries.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Definition of Quality, Dimensions of Quality, Quality Planning, Quality costs - Analysis
Techniques for Quality Costs, Basic concepts of Total Quality Management, Historical
Review, Principles of TQM, Leadership – Concepts, Role of Senior Management,
Quality Council, Quality Statements, Strategic Planning, Deming Philosophy, Barriers to
TQM Implementation.
UNIT II TQM PRINCIPLES 9
Customer satisfaction – Customer Perception of Quality, Customer Complaints, Service
Quality, Customer Retention, Employee Involvement – Motivation, Empowerment,
Teams, Recognition and Reward, Performance Appraisal, Benefits, Continuous Process
Improvement – Juran Trilogy, PDSA Cycle, 5S, Kaizen, Supplier Partnership –
Partnering, sourcing, Supplier Selection, Supplier Rating, Relationship Development,
Performance Measures – Basic Concepts, Strategy, Performance Measure.
UNIT III STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL (SPC) 9
The seven tools of quality, Statistical Fundamentals – Measures of central Tendency
and Dispersion, Population and Sample, Normal Curve, Control Charts for variables and
attributes, Process capability, Concept of six sigma, New seven Management tools.
UNIT IV TQM TOOLS 9
Benchmarking – Reasons to Benchmark, Benchmarking Process, Quality Function
Deployment (QFD) – House of Quality, QFD Process, Benefits, Taguchi Quality Loss
Function, Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) – Concept, Improvement Needs, FMEA –
Stages of FMEA.
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UNIT V QUALITY SYSTEMS 9
Need for ISO 9000 and Other Quality Systems, ISO 9000:2000 Quality System –
Elements, Implementation of Quality System, Documentation, Quality Auditing, TS
16949, ISO 14000 – Concept, Requirements and Benefits.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Dale H.Besterfiled, et al., “Total Quality Management”, Pearson Education, Inc.
2003. (Indian reprint 2004). ISBN 81-297-0260-6.
REFERENCES
1. Evans. J. R. & Lindsay. W,M “The Management and Control of Quality”, (5th Edition),
South-Western (Thomson Learning), 2002 (ISBN 0-324-06680-5).
2. Feigenbaum.A.V. “Total Quality Management”, McGraw-Hill, 1991.
3. Oakland.J.S. “Total Quality Management”, Butterworth Hcinemann Ltd., Oxford,
1989.
4. Narayana V. and Sreenivasan, N.S. “Quality Management – Concepts and Tasks”,
New Age International 1996.
5. Zeiri. “Total Quality Management for Engineers”, Wood Head Publishers, 1991.
AE2401 AVIONICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To introduce the basic concepts of navigation & communication systems of aircraft.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION TO AVIONICS 8
Need for Avionics in civil and military aircraft and space systems – Integrated Avionics
system – Typical avionics sub systems – Design approaches and recent advances -
Application Technologies.
UNIT II PRINCIPLES OF DIGITAL SYSTEMS 10
Digital Computers – Digital number system- number systems and codes-Fundamentals
of logic and combinational logic circuits –Digital arithmetic – interfacing with analogue
systems - Microprocessors – Memories.-
UNIT III DIGITAL AVIONICS ARCHITECTURE 8
Avionics system architecture– salient features and applications of Data buses MIL–STD
1553 B–ARINC 429–ARINC 629.
UNIT IV FLIGHT DECK AND COCKPITS 9
Control and display technologies CRT, LED, LCD, EL and plasma panel - Touch screen
- Direct voice input (DVI) - Civil cockpit and military cockpit : MFDS, HUD, MFK, HOTAS
UNIT V AVIONICS SYSTEMS 10
Communication Systems - Navigation systems - Flight control systems - Radar
electronic warfare - Utility systems Reliability and maintainability - Certification.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
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TEXT BOOKS
1. Malcrno A.P. and Leach, D.P., “Digital Principles and Application”, Tata McGraw-Hill,
1990.
2. Gaonkar, R.S., “Microprocessors Architecture – Programming and Application”,
Wiley and Sons Ltd., New Delhi, 1990.
REFERENCES
1. Middleton, D.H., Ed., “Avionics Systems, Longman Scientific and Technical”,
Longman Group UK Ltd., England, 1989.
2. Spitzer, C.R., “Digital Avionic Systems”, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA.,
1987.
3. Brain Kendal, “Manual of Avionics”, The English Book House, 3rd Edition, New Delhi,
1993.
AE2402 COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the flow of dynamic fluids by computational methods
UNIT I FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS 10
Introduction - Basic Equations of Fluid Dynamics - Incompressible In viscid Flows:
Source, vortex and doublet panel, methods - lifting flows over arbitrary bodies.
Mathematical properties of Fluid Dynamics Equations -_ Elliptic, Parabolic and
Hyperbolic equations - Well posed problems - discretization of partial Differential
Equations. Explicit finite difference methods of subsonic, supersonic and viscous flows.
UNIT II GRID GENERATION 7
Structured grids. Types and transformations.Generation of structured grids. Unstructured
grids. Delany triangulation.
UNIT III DISCRETIZATION 8
Boundary layer Equations and methods of solution -Implicit time dependent methods for
inviscid and viscous compressible flows - Concept of numerical dissipation --Stability
properties of explicit and implicit methods - Conservative upwind discretization for
Hyperbolic systems - Further advantages of upwind differencing.
UNIT IV FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUES 6
Overview of Finite Element Techniques in Computational Fluid Dynamics. Strong and
Weak Formulations of a Boundary Value Problem.
UNIT V FINITE VOLUME TECHNIQUES 14
Finite Volume Techniques - Cell Centered Formulation - Lax - Vendoroff Time Stepping -
Runge - Kutta Time Stepping - Multi - stage Time Stepping - Accuracy -. Cell Vertex
Formulation - Multistage Time Stepping - FDM -like Finite Volume Techniques - Central
and Up-wind Type Discretizations - Treatment of Derivatives. Flux – splitting schemes.
Pressure correction solvers – SIMPLE, PESO. Vorticity transport formulation.
Implicit/semi-implicit schemes.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
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TEXT BOOK
1. Fletcher, C.A.J., “Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics”, Vols. I and II,
Springer - Verlag, Berlin, 1988.
REFERENCES
1. John F. Wendt (Editor), “Computational Fluid Dynamics - An Introduction”, Springer –
Verlag, Berlin, 1992
2. Charles Hirsch, “Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows”, Vols. I and
II. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1988.
3. Klaus A Hoffmann and Steve T. Chiang. “Computational Fluid Dynamics for
Engineers”, Vols. I & II Engineering Education System, P.O. Box 20078, W. Wichita,
K.S., 67208 - 1078 USA, 1993.
4. Anderson, Jr.D., “Fundamentals of Aerodynamics”, McGraw-Hill, 2000.
AE2403 VIBRATIONS & ELEMENTS OF AEROELASTICITY L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the dynamic behaviour of different aircraft components and the interaction
among the aerodynamic, elastic and inertia forces
UNIT I BASIC NOTIONS 8
Simple harmonic motion – Terminologies – Newton’s Law – D’ Alembert’s principle –
Energy Methods
UNIT II SINGLE DEGREE OF FREEDOM SYSTEMS 12
Free vibrations – Damped vibrations – Forced Vibrations, with and without damping –
support excitation – Vibration measuring instruments.
UNIT III MULTI DEGREES OF FREEDOM SYSTEMS 10
Two degrees of freedom systems – Static and Dynamic couplings vibration absorber-
Principal co- ordinates, Principal modes and orthogonal condition – Eigen value
problems.
Hamilton’s principle- Lagrangean equation and application – Vibration of elastic bodies-
Vibration of strings- Longitudinal, Lateral and Torsional vibrations.
UNIT IV APPROXIMATE METHODS 5
Rayleigh’s and Holzer Methods to find natural frequencies.
UNIT V ELEMENTS OF AEROELASTICITY 10
Concepts – Coupling – Aero elastic instabilities and their prevention – Basic ideas on
wing divergence, loss and reversal of aileron control – Flutter and its prevention.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODDS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Timoshenko S., “Vibration Problems in Engineering”– John Wiley and Sons, New
York, 1993.
2. Fung Y.C., “An Introduction to the Theory of Aeroelasticity” – John Wiley & Sons,
New York, 1995.
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REFERENCES
1. Bisplinghoff R.L., Ashley H and Hoffman R.L., “Aeroelasticity” – Addision Wesley
Publication, New York, 1983.
2. Tse. F.S., Morse, I.F., Hinkle, R.T., “Mechanical Vibrations”, – Prentice Hall, New
York, 1984.
3. Scanlan R.H. & Rosenbaum R., “Introduction to the study of Aircraft Vibration &
Flutter”, John Wiley and Sons. New York, 1982.
4. Tongue. B. H., “Principles of Vibration”, Oxford University Press, 2000.
AE2404 AIRCRAFT DESIGN PROJECT – II L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
 To enhance the knowledge in continuation of the design given in project–I
 Each student is assigned the work in continuation of the design project – I. The
following assignments are to be carried out.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. V-n diagram for the design study
2. Gust and maneuverability envelopes
3. Critical loading performance and final V-n graph calculation
4. Structural design study – Theory approach
5. Load estimation of wings
6. Load estimation of fuselage.
7. Balancing and Maneuvering loads on tail plane, Aileron and Rudder loads.
8. Detailed structural layouts
9. Design of some components of wings, fuselage
10. Preparation of a detailed design report with drawings.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 30 students)
S.No. Items Quantity
1. Drawing Board 30
2. Drawing Instrument 20
3. Computers and suitable
software
30
AE2405 AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
To train the students “ON HAND” experience in maintenance of various air frame
systems in aircraft and rectification of common snags.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Aircraft “Jacking Up” procedure
2. Aircraft “Levelling” procedure
3. Control System “Rigging check” procedure
4. Aircraft “Symmetry Check” procedure
5. “Flow test” to assess of filter element clogging
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6. “Pressure Test” To assess hydraulic External/Internal Leakage
7. “Functional Test” to adjust operating pressure
8. “Pressure Test” procedure on fuel system components
9. “Brake Torque Load Test” on wheel brake units
10. Maintenance and rectification of snags in hydraulic and fuel systems.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 30 students)
S.No. Items Quantity Experiment No.
1. Serviceable aircraft with all above
systems
1 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
2. Hydraulic Jacks (Screw Jack) 5 1,2,4,8
3. Trestle adjustable 5 1,2,4,8
4. Spirit Level 2 8
5. Levelling Boards 2 8
6. Cable Tensiometer 1 8
7. Adjustable Spirit Level 1 8
8. Plumb Bob 1 8
AE2406 AVIONICS LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
This laboratory is divided into three parts to train the students to learn about basic digital
electronics circuits, programming with microprocessors, design and implementation of
data buses in avionics with MIL – Std. 1553B and remote terminal configuration and their
importance in different applications in the field of Avionics.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
Addition/Subtraction of binary numbers.
Multiplexer/Demultiplexer Circuits.
Encoder/Decoder Circuits.
Timer Circuits, Shift Registers, Binary Comparator Circuits.
MICROPROCESSORS
Addition and Subtraction of 8-bit and 16-bit numbers.
Sorting of Data in Ascending & Descending order.
Sum of a given series with and without carry.
Greatest in a given series & Multi-byte addition in BCD mode.
Interface programming with 4 digit 7 segment Display & Switches & LED’s.
16 Channel Analog to Digital Converter & Generation of Ramp, Square, Triangular wave
by Digital to Analog Converter.
AVIONICS DATA BUSES
Study of Different Avionics Data Buses.
MIL-Std – 1553 Data Buses Configuration with Message transfer.
MIL-Std – 1553 Remote Terminal Configuration.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
15
LIST OF EQUIPMENT
(for a batch of 30 students)
S.No. Details of Equipments Quantity Experiment
Nos.
1. Adder/Subtractor Binary bits Kit 6 1
2 Timer Kit 6 1
3 Encoder Kit 6 3
4 Decoder Kit 6 3
5 Comparator Kit 6 4
6 Multiplexer Kit 6 2
7 Demultiplexer Kit 6 2
8 Shift Registers Kit 6 4
9 Electronic Design Experimeter 6 6,7,9,10
10 Microprocessor 8085 Kit 9 5,6,7,8,9,10
11 4 Digit 7 Segment Display 3 6
12 Switches & LED’s Circuit 3 6
13 16 Channel AD Converter 6 10,9
14 Digital to Analog Converter 6 10
15 Cathode Ray Oscilloscope 3 9,10
16 Regulated Power Supply (5V DC) 9 1, 2,3,4
17 MIL-Std 1553B Setup with Remote
Terminal
1 12,13
18 Computers 2 11,12,13
AE2407 IDENTIFICATION OF PROJECT WORK L T P C
0 0 2 1
OBJECTIVE:
The students shall be divided into convenient groups of not more than 4 members and
will be assigned a staff member as guide. The area and the problem will be identified
along with the problem definition. The students will be initiated into literature survey,
assessment of hard ware and soft ware requirements and initial purchase of materials
and fabrication towards the realization of the project in the ensuing semester
TOTAL: 30 PERIODS
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AE2451 COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To understand the fabrication, analysis and design of composite materials & structures.
UNIT I STRESS STRAIN RELATION 8
Introduction- Advantages and application of composite materials, reinforcements and
matrices – Generalised Hooke’s Law – Elastic constants for anisotropic, orthotropic and
isotropic materials.
UNIT II METHODS OF ANALYSIS 10
Micro mechanics – Mechanics of materials approach, elasticity approach to determine
material properties – Macro Mechanics – Stress-strain relations with respect to natural
axis, arbitrary axis – Determination of material properties. Experimental characterization
of lamina.
UNIT III LAMINATED PLATES 10
Governing differential equation for a general laminate, angle ply and cross ply laminates.
Failure criteria for composites.
UNIT IV SANDWICH CONSTRUCTIONS 9
Basic design concepts of sandwich construction -Materials used for sandwich
construction - Failure modes of sandwich panels.
UNIT V FABRICATION PROCESSES 8
Various Open and closed mould processes. Manufacture of fibers – Types of resins and
properties and applications – Netting analysis.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Calcote, L R. “The Analysis of laminated Composite Structures”, Von – Noastrand
Reinhold Company, New York 1998.
2. Jones, R.M., “Mechanics of Composite Materials”, McGraw-Hill, Kogakusha Ltd.,
Tokyo, 1998, II edition.
REFERENCES
1. Agarwal, B.D., and Broutman, L.J., “Analysis and Performance of Fibre
Composites”, John Wiley and sons. Inc., New York, 1995.
2. Lubin, G., “Handbook on Advanced Plastics and Fibre Glass”, Von Nostrand
Reinhold Co., New York, 1989.
AE2452 COMPREHENSION AND TECHNICAL SEMINAR L T P C
(Common To All Branches) 0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE
The objective of comprehension is to provide opportunity for the student to apply the
knowledge acquired during the earlier semesters to real life problems which he / she
may have to face in future as an engineer. While learning as how to solve the real life
problems, student will receive guidance from the faculty and also review various courses
learnt earlier.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
17
AE2453 PROJECT WORK L T P C
(Common to all Branches) 0 0 12 6
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the project work is to enable the students in convenient groups of not
more than 4 members on a project involving theoretical and experimental studies related
to the branch of study. Every project work shall have a guide who is the member of the
faculty of the institution. Six periods per week shall be allotted in the time table and this
time shall be utilized by the students to receive the directions from the guide, on library
reading, laboratory work, computer analysis or field work as assigned by the guide and
also to present in periodical seminars on the progress made in the project.
Each student shall finally produce a comprehensive report covering background
information, literature survey, problem statement, project work details and conclusion.
This final report shall be in typewritten form as specified in the guidelines.
The continuous assessment shall be made as prescribed by the regulation (vide clause
10.3 of Anna University Regulations 2004 for B.E., B.Tech. programmes)
TOTAL: 180 PERIODS
AE2021 THEORY OF ELASTICITY L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To understand the theoretical concepts of material behaviour with particular emphasis
on their elastic property
UNIT I ASSUMPTIONS IN ELASTICITY 4
Definitions- notations and sign conventions for stress and strain, Equations of
equilibrium.
UNIT II BASIC EQUATIONS OF ELASTICITY 15
Strain – displacement relations, Stress – strain relations, Lame’s constant – cubical
dilation, Compressibility of material, bulk modulus, Shear modulus, Compatibility
equations for stresses and strains, Principal stresses and principal strains, Mohr’s circle,
Saint Venant’s principle.
UNIT III PLANE STRESS AND PLANE STRAIN PROBLEMS 8
Airy’s stress function, Bi-harmonic equations, Polynomial solutions, Simple twodimensional
problems in Cartesian coordinates like bending of cantilever and simply
supported beams, etc.
UNIT IV POLAR COORDINATES 10
Equations of equilibrium, Strain displacement relations, Stress – strain relations, Axi –
symmetric problems, Kirsch, Michell’s and Boussinesque problems.
UNIT V TORSION 8
Navier’s theory, St. Venant’s theory, Prandtl’s theory on torsion, The semi- inverse
method and applications to shafts of circular, elliptical, equilateral triangular and
rectangular sections.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Timoshenko, S., and Goodier, T.N., “Theory of Elasticity”, McGraw–Hill Ltd., Tokyo,
1990.
18
REFERENCES
1. Enrico Volterra & J.H. Caines, “Advanced Strength of Materials”, Prentice Hall New
Jersey, 1991.
2. Wng, C.T., “Applied Elasticity”, McGraw–Hill Co., New York, 1993.
3. Sokolnikoff, I.S., “Mathematical Theory of Elasticity”, McGraw–Hill New York, 1978.
AE2022 AIRCRAFT GENERAL ENGINEERING AND L T P C
MAINTENANCE PRACTICES 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To teach the students about the basic concepts of aircraft general engineering and
maintenance practices.
UNIT I AIRCRAFT GROUND HANDLING AND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT 10
Mooring, jacking, leveling and towing operations – Preparation – Equipment –
precautions – Engine starting procedures – Piston engine, turboprops and turbojets –
Engine fire extinguishing – Ground power unit.
UNIT II GROUND SERVICING OF VARIOUS SUB SYSTEMS 8
Air conditioning and pressurization – Oxygen and oil systems – Ground units and their
maintenance.
UNIT III MAINTENANCE OF SAFETY 5
Shop safety – Environmental cleanliness – Precautions
UNIT IV INSPECTION 10
Process – Purpose – Types – Inspection intervals – Techniques – Checklist – Special
inspection – Publications, bulletins, various manuals – FAR Air worthiness directives –
Type certificate Data sheets – ATA Specifications
UNIT V AIRCRAFT HARDWARE, MATERIALS, SYSTEM PROCESSES 12
Hand tools – Precision instruments – Special tools and equipments in an airplane
maintenance shop – Identifiation terminology – Specification and correct use of various
aircraft hardware (i.e. nuts, bolts, rivets, screws etc) – American and British systems of
specifications – Threads, gears, bearings, etc – Drills, tapes and reamers – Identification
of all types of fluid line fittings. Materials, metallic and non-metallic = Plumbing
connectors – Cables – Swaging procedures, tests, Advantages of swaging over splicing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Kroes Watkins Delp, Aircraft Maintenance and Repair, McGraw Hill, New York, 1993.
REFERENCES:
1. A&P Mechanics, Aircraft Hand Book, F A A Himalayan Book House, New Delhi,
1996
2. A&P Mechanics, General Hand Book, F A A Himalayan Bok House, New Delhi, 1996
19
AE2023 SPACE MECHANICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the basic concepts of orbital Mechanics with particular emphasis on
interplanetary trajectories
UNIT I BASIC CONCEPTS 4
The Solar System – References Frames and Coordinate Systems – The Celestial
Sphere – The Ecliptic – Motion of Vernal Equinox – Sidereal Time – Solar Time –
Standard Time – The Earth’s Atmosphere.
UNIT II THE GENERAL N-BODY PROBLEM 10
The many body Problem – Lagrange – Jacobian Identity –The Circular Restricted Three
Body Problem – Libration Points- Relative Motion in the N-body Problem –Two –Body
Problem – Satellite Orbits – Relations Between Position and Time – Orbital Elements.
UNIT III SATELLITE INJECTION AND SATELLITE ORBIT PERTURBATIONS 12
General Aspects of satellite Injections – Satellite Orbit Transfer –Various Cases – Orbit
Deviations Due to Injection Errors – Special and General Perturbations – Cowell’s
Method – Encke’s Method – Method of vibrations of Orbital Elements – General
Perturbations Approach.
UNIT IV INTERPLANETARY TRAJECTORIES 6
Two Dimensional Interplanetary Trajectories –Fast Interplanetary Trajectories – Three
Dimensional Interplanetary Trajectories – Launch if Interplanetary Spacecraft –
Trajectory about the Target Planet.
UNIT V BALLISTIC MISSILE TRAJECTORIES AND MATERIALS 13
The Boost Phase – The Ballistic Phase –Trajectory Geometry- Optimal Flights – Time of
Flight – Re – entry Phase – The Position of the Impact Point – Influence Coefficients.
Space Environment – Peculiarities – Effect of Space Environment on the Selection of
Spacecraft Material.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Cornelisse, J.W., “Rocket Propulsion and Space Dynamic”, W.H. Freeman & Co.,
1984.
REFERENCES
1. Sutton, G.P., “Rocket Propulsion Elements”, John Wiley, 1993.
2. Van de Kamp, P., “Elements of Astro-mechanics”, Pitman, 1979.
3. Parker E.R., “Materials for Missiles and Spacecraft”, McGraw-Hill Book Co. Inc.,1982.
AE2024 HEAT TRANSFER L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To introduce the concepts of heat transfer to enable the students to design components
subjected to thermal loading.
20
UNIT I HEAT CONDUCTION 11
Basic Modes of Heat Transfer – One dimensional steady state heat conduction:
Composite Medium – Critical thickness – Effect of variation of thermal Conductivity –
Extended Surfaces – Unsteady state.
Heat Conduction: Lumped System Analysis – Heat Transfer in Semi infinite and infinite
solids – Use of Transient – Temperature charts – Application of numerical techniques.
UNIT II CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER 10
Introduction – Free convection in atmosphere free convection on a vertical flat plate –
Empirical relation in free convection – Forced convection – Laminar and turbulent
convective heat transfer analysis in flows between parallel plates, over a flat plate and in
a circular pipe. Empirical relations, application of numerical techniques in problem
solving.
UNIT III RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER 8
Introduction to Physical mechanism – Radiation properties – Radiation shape factors –
Heat exchange between non – black bodies – Radiation shields.
UNIT IV HEAT EXCHANGERS 8
Classification – Temperature Distribution – Overall heat transfer coefficient, Heat
Exchange Analysis – LMTD Method and E-NTU Method.
UNIT V HEAT TRANSFER PROBLEMS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 8
High-Speed flow Heat Transfer, Heat Transfer problems in gas turbine combustion
chambers – Rocket thrust chambers – Aerodynamic heating – Ablative heat transfer.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Yunus A. Cengel., “Heat Transfer – A practical approach”, Second Edition, Tata
McGraw-Hill, 2002.
2. Incropera. F.P.and Dewitt.D.P. “ Introduction to Heat Transfer”, John Wiley and Sons
– 2002.
REFERENCES
1. Lienhard, J.H., “A Heat Transfer Text Book”, Prentice Hall Inc., 1981.
2. Holman, J.P. “Heat Transfer”, McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., New York, 6th Edn., 1991.
3. Sachdeva, S.C., “Fundamentals of Engineering Heat & Mass Transfer”, Wiley
Eastern Ltd., New Delhi, 1981.
4. Mathur, M. and Sharma, R.P. “Gas Turbine and Jet and Rocket Propulsion”,
Standard Publishers, New Delhi 1988.
AE2025 HELICOPTER THEORY L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To present the basic ideas of evolution, performance and associated stability problems
of helicopter.
UNIT I DEVELOPMENT OF ROTATING WING AIRCRAFT 6
Evolution of helicopter-Helicopter configurations-rotor arrangements-compound
Helicopter - jet rotor-no tail rotor concepts
UNIT II DYNAMICS OF HOVERING FLIGHT 12
Actuator disc theory-Blade Element Theory-ideal twist Induced & profile power-Figure of
merit-Thrust and power coefficients-calculation of drag, torque, power-Ground effect in
hover- Estimation of hover ceiling.
21
UNIT III DYNAMICS OF FORWARD FLIGHT 10
Forward flight performance-Parasite drag and Power-Stall limitations-flapping-cyclic
Pitch - Autorotation in hover and in forward flight-Dead man’s curve.
UNIT IV CLIMB AND DESCENT PERFORMANCE 9
Vertical flight-flow patterns surrounding the rotor-Power required in climb and descent-
Descent speed calculations-Take-off techniques.
UNIT V HELICOPTER STABILITY AND CONTROL 8
Trim-Static stability-dynamic stability-Pilot’s control-Rotor control-Flight control systems
and stability argumentation-Flying qualities.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Gessow A & Myers G.C “Aerodynamics of Helicopter” Mac Millan & Co, 1987
REFERENCES:
1. Gupta. L “Helicopter Engineering”, Himalayan Books, 1996
2. Saunders “Dynamics of Helicopter flight”, John Wiley, 1975
3. Newman. S “Foundation of Helicopter Flight” Halsted Press, 1994
4. Seddon. J “Basic Helicopter Aerodynamics” AIAA education series, 1990.
AE2026 INDUSTRIAL AERODYNAMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To familiarize the learner with non-aeronautical uses of aerodynamics such as road
vehicle, building aerodynamics and problems of flow induced vibrations.
UNIT I ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER 8
Atmospheric circulation-Local winds-Terrain types-Mean velocity profiles-Power law and
logarithm law- wind speeds-Turbulence profiles-Roughness parameters-simulation
techniques in wind tunnels
UNIT II BLUFF BODY AERODYNAMICS 10
Boundary layers and separation-Two dimensional wake and vortex formation-Strouhal
and Reynolds numbers-Separation and reattachments-Power requirements and drag
coefficients of automobiles-Effects of cut back angle-aerodynamics of trains.
UNIT III WIND ENERGY COLLECTORS 9
Horizontal and vertical axis machines-energy density of different rotors-Power
coefficient-Betz coefficient by momentum theory.
UNIT IV BUILDING AERODYNAMICS 8
Pressure distribution on low rise buildings-wind forces on buildings-Environmental winds
in city blocks-special problems of tall buildings-building codes-ventilation and
architectural aerodynamics
22
UNIT V FLOW INDUCED VIBRATIONS 10
Vortex shedding, lock & effects of Reynolds number on wake formation in turbulent flows
- across wind galloping-wake galloping-along wind galloping of circular cables-oscillation
of tall structures and launch vehicles under wind loads-stall flutter.
TOTAL: 45 PEERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Scorer R.S “Environmental Aerodynamics”, Ellis Harwood Ltd, England, 1978
2. Sovran, M(ed) “Aerodynamic drag mechanism of bluff bodies and road vehicles”,
Plenum Press, N.Y, 1978
3. Sachs P “Wind Forces in Engineering”, Pergamon Press, 1988
4. Blevins R.D “Flow Induced Vibrations”, Van Nostrand, 1990
5. Calvert N.G “Wind Power Principles”, Charles Griffin & Co London, 1979
AE2027 AIRFRAME MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the maintenance aspect of airframe systems and rectification of snags
UNIT I WELDING IN AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS 10
Equipments used in welding shop and their maintenance – Ensuring quality welds –
Welding jigs and fixtures – Soldering and brazing.
SHEET METAL REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE
Inspection of damage – Classification – Repair or replacement – Sheet metal inspection
– N.D.T. Testing – Riveted repair design, Damage investigation – reverse technology.
UNIT II PLASTICS AND COMPOSITES IN AIRCRAFT 10
Review of types of plastics used in airplanes – Maintenance and repair of plastic
components – Repair of cracks, holes etc., various repair schemes – Scopes.Inspection
and Repair of composite components – Special precautions – Autoclaves.
UNIT III AIRCRAFT JACKING, ASSEMBLY AND RIGGING 8
Airplane jacking and weighing and C.G. Location. Balancing of control surfaces –
Inspection maintenance. Helicopter flight controls. Tracking and balancing of main rotor.
UNIT IV REVIEW OF HYDRAULIC AND PNEUMATIC SYSTEM 10
Trouble shooting and maintenance practices – Service and inspection. – Inspection and
maintenance of landing gear systems. – Inspection and maintenance of air-conditioning
and pressurisation system, water and waste system. Installation and maintenance of
Instruments – handling – Testing – Inspection. Inspection and maintenance of auxiliary
systems – Fire protection systems – Ice protection system – Rain removal system –
Position and warning system – Auxiliary Power Units (APUs)
UNIT V SAFETY PRACTICES 7
Hazardous materials storage and handling, Aircraft furnishing practices – Equipments.
Trouble shooting - Theory and practices.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. KROES, WATKINS, DELP, “Aircraft Maintenance and Repair”, McGraw-Hill, New
York, 1992.
23
REFERENCES
1. LARRY REITHMEIR, “Aircraft Repair Manual”, Palamar Books, Marquette, 1992.
2. BRIMM D.J. BOGGES H.E., “Aircraft Maintenance”, Pitman Publishing corp. New
York, 1940
AE2028 AERO ENGINE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the basic concepts of the maintenance and repair of both piston and jet aero
engines and the procedures followed for overhaul of aero engines.
UNIT I CLASSIFICATION OF PISTON ENGINE COMPONENTS 5
Types of piston engines – Principles of operation – Function of components – Materials
used – Details of starting the engines – Details of carburetion and injection systems for
small and large engines – Ignition system components – Spark plug details – Engine
operating conditions at various altitudes – Maintenance and inspection check to be
carried out.
UNIT II INSPECTIONS OF PISTON ENGINES 8
Inspection and maintenance and trouble shooting – Inspection of all engine components
– Daily and routine checks – Overhaul procedures – Compression testing of cylinders –
Special inspection schedules – Engine fuel, control and exhaust systems – Engine
mount and super charger – Checks and inspection procedures.
UNIT III OVERHAULING OF PISTON ENGINES 10
Symptoms of failure – Fault diagnostics – Case studies of different engine systems – l:
Tools and equipment requirements for various checks and alignment during overhauling
– Tools for inspection – Tools for safety and for visual inspection – Methods and
instruments for non destructive testing techniques – Equipment for replacement of part
and their repair. Engine testing: Engine testing procedures and schedule preparation –
Online maintenance.
UNIT IV CLASSIFICATION OF JET ENGINE COMPONENTS 12
12 Types of jet engines – Principles of operation – Functions of components – Materials
used – Details of starting and operating procedures – Gas turbine engine inspection &
checks – Use of instruments for online maintenance – Special inspection procedures :
Foreign Object Damage – Blade damage – etc.
Maintenance procedures of gas turbine engines – Trouble shooting and rectification
procedures – Component maintenance procedures – Systems maintenance procedures.
Gas turbine testing procedures – test schedule preparation – Storage of Engines –
Preservation and de-preservation procedures.
UNIT V OVERHAUL PROCEDURES 10
Engine Overhaul procedures – Inspections and cleaning of components – Repairs
schedules for overhaul – Balancing of Gas turbine components.
Trouble Shooting - Procedures for rectification – Condition monitoring of the engine on
ground and at altitude – engine health monitoring and corrective methods.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
24
TEXT BOOK
1. KROES & WILD, “Aircraft Power plants”, 7th Edition – McGraw Hill, New York, 1994.
REFERENCES
1. TURBOMECA, “Gas Turbine Engines”, The English Book Store, New Delhi, 1993.
2. UNITED TECHNOLOGIES PRATT & WHITNEY, “The Aircraft Gas turbine Engine
and its Operation”, (latest edition) The English Book Store, New Delhi.
AE2029 THEORY OF PLATES AND SHELLS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the behaviour of the plates and shells with different geometry under various
types of loads.
UNIT I CLASSICAL PLATE THEORY 3
Classical Plate Theory – Assumptions – Differential Equation – Boundary Conditions.
UNIT II PLATES OF VARIOUS SHADES 15
Navier’s Method of Solution for Simply Supported Rectangular Plates – Leavy’s Method
of Solution for Rectangular Plates under Different Boundary Conditions. Governing
Equation – Solution for Axi-symmetric loading – Annular Plates – Plates of other shapes.
UNIT III EIGEN VALUE ANALYSIS 8
Stability and free Vibration Analysis of Rectangular Plates.
UNIT IV APPROXIMATE METHODS 10
Rayleigh – Ritz, Galerkin Methods– Finite Difference Method – Application to
Rectangular Plates for Static, Free Vibration and Stability Analysis.
UNIT V SHELLS 9
Basic Concepts of Shell Type of Structures – Membrane and Bending Theories for
Circular Cylindrical Shells.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. Timoshenko, S.P. Winowsky. S., and Kreger, “Theory of Plates and Shells”,
McGraw-Hill Book Co. 1990.
2. T. K. Varadan and K. Bhaskar, “Theory of Plates and Shells”,1999, Narosa .
REFERENCES
1. Flugge, W. “Stresses in Shells”, Springer – Verlag, 1985.
2. Timoshenko, S.P. and Gere, J.M., “Theory of Elastic Stability”, McGraw-Hill Book Co.
1986
25
AE2032 EXPERIMENTAL AERODYNAMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
To present the measurement techniques involved in aerodynamic testing.
UNIT I WIND TUNNEL TESTING 8
Low speed wind tunnels-estimation of energy ratio and power required supersonic win
tunnels-calculation of running time and storage tank requirements.
UNIT II EXPERIMENTS IN SUBSONIC WIND TUNNELS 10
Estimation of flow angularity and turbulence factor-calculation of CL and CD on aero foils
from pressure distribution- CD from wake survey-Test section average velocity using
traversing rakes-span wise load distribution for different taper ratios of wing
UNIT III EXPERIMENTS IN HIGH SPEED TUNNELS 10
Mach number estimation in test section by pressure measurement and using a wedge –
preliminary estimates of blowing and running pressures, nozzle area ratios, mass flow
for a given test section size and Mach number-starting problem and starting loads.
UNIT IV MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES 9
Hot wire anemometer and laser Doppler anemometer for turbulence and velocity
measurements-Use of thermocouples and pyrometers for measurement of static and
total temperatures-Use of pressure transducers, Rotameters and ultrasonic flow meters.
UNIT V SPECIAL PROBLEMS 8
Pitot-static tube correction for subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers-boundary layer
velocity profile on a flat plate by momentum-integral method -Calculation of CD from wall
shear stress-Heating requirements in hypersonic wind tunnels-Re-entry problems.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Rae W.H and Pope. A “Low speed wind tunnel testing” John Wiley Publication, 1984
2. Pope. A and Goin. L “High speed wind tunnel testing” John Wiley, 1985
3. Rathakrishnan. E “Instrumentation, Measurement and Experiments in Fluids”, CRC
Press, London, 2007
AE2031 HYPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To present the basic ideas of hypersonic flow and the associated problem areas.
UNIT I FUNDAMENTALS OF HYPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS 9
Introduction to hypersonic aerodynamics-differences between hypersonic aerodynamics
and supersonic aerodynamics-concept of thin shock layers-hypersonic flight pathshypersonic
similarity parameters-shock wave and expansion wave relations of in viscid
hypersonic flows.
UNIT II SIMPLE SOLUTION METHODS FOR HYPERSONIC
IN VISCID FLOWS 9
Local surface inclination methods-Newtonian theory-modified Newtonian law-tangent
wedge and tangent cone and shock expansion methods-approximate theory-thin shock
layer theory.
26
UNIT III VISCOUS HYPERSONIC FLOW THEORY 9
Boundary layer equation for hypersonic flow-hypersonic boundary layers-self similar and
non self similar boundary layers-solution methods for non self similar boundary layersaerodynamic
heating.
UNIT IV VISCOUS INTERACTIONS IN HYPERSONIC FLOWS 9
Introduction to the concept of viscous interaction in hypersonic flows-strong and weak
viscous interactions-hypersonic viscous interaction similarity parameter-introduction to
shock wave boundary layer interactions.
UNIT V INTRODUCTION TO HIGH TEMPERATURE EFFECTS 9
Nature of high temperature flows-chemical effects in air-real and perfect gases-Gibb’s
free energy and entropy-chemically reacting mixtures-recombination and dissociation.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. John. D. Anderson. Jr., “Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dyanmics”, Mc.
Graw hill Series, New York, 1996.
REFERENCES:
1. John. D. Anderson. Jr ., “Modern compressible flow with historical perspective”, Mc.
Graw Hill Publishing Company, New York, 1996.\
2. John. T Bertin, “Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics”, published by AIAA Inc.,
Washington. D.C., 1994.
AE2033 ROCKETS AND MISSILES L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To introduce basic concepts of design and trajectory estimation of rocket and missiles
UNIT I ROCKET MOTION IN FREE SPACE AND GRAVITATIONAL FIELD 10
One Dimensional and Two Dimensional rocket Motions in Free Space and
Homogeneous Gravitational Fields – description of Vertical, Inclined and Gravity Turn
Trajectories – Determination of range and Altitude Simple Approximations to Burnout
Velocity.
UNIT II STAGING AND CONTROL OF ROCKETS AND MISSILES 10
Multistaging of rockets – Vehicle Optimization – Stage Separation Dynamics –
Separation Techniques. Rocket Thrust Vector Control Methods.
UNIT III AERODYNAMICS OF ROCKETS AND MISSILES 10
Airframe Components of Rockets and Missiles – Forces Acting on a Missile While
Passing Through Atmosphere – Classification of Missiles – methods of Describing
Aerodynamic Forces and Moments – Lateral Aerodynamic Moment – Lateral Damping
Moment and Longitudinal Moment of a Rocket – lift and Drag Forces – Drag Estimation.
UNIT IV ROCKET PROPULSION SYSTEMS 10
Ignition System in rockets – types of Igniters – Igniter Design Considerations – Design
Consideration of liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber, Injector Propellant Feed Lines,
Valves, Propellant Tanks Outlet and Helium Pressurized and Turbine feed Systems –
Propellant Slash and Propellant Hammer – Elimination of Geysering Effect in Missiles –
Combustion System of Solid Rockets.
27
UNIT V MATERIALS FOR ROCKETS AND MISSILES 5
Selection of Materials – Special Requirements of Materials to Perform under Adverse
Conditions.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Sutton, G.P., et al., “Rocket Propulsion Elements”, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New
York, 1993.
REFERENCES
1. Mathur, M., and Sharma, R.P., “Gas Turbines and Jet and Rocket Propulsion”,
Standard Publishers, New Delhi 1998.
2. Cornelisse, J.W., “Rocket Propulsion and Space Dynamics”, J.W., Freeman & Co.
Ltd., London, 1982.
3. Parker, E.R., “Materials for Missiles and Spacecraft”, McGraw-Hill Book Co. Inc.,
1982.
AE2030 FATIGUE AND FRACTURE L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the concepts of estimation of the endurance and failure mechanism of
components
UNIT I FATIGUE OF STRUCTURES 8
S.N. curves - Endurance limits - Effect of mean stress, Goodman, Gerber and Soderberg
relations and diagrams - Notches and stress concentrations - Neuber’s stress
concentration factors - Plastic stress concentration factors - Notched S.N. curves.
UNIT II STATISTICAL ASPECTS OF FATIGUE BEHAVIOUR 9
Low cycle and high cycle fatigue - Coffin - Manson’s relation - Transition life - cyclic
strain hardening and softening - Analysis of load histories - Cycle counting techniques -
Cumulative damage - Miner’s theory - Other theories.
UNIT III PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF FATIGUE AND FRACTURE 12
Phase in fatigue life - Crack initiation - Crack growth - Final Fracture - Dislocations -
fatigue fracture surfaces - Strength and stress analysis of cracked bodies - Potential
energy and surface energy - Griffith’s theory - Irwin - Orwin extension of Griffith’s theory
to ductile materials - Effect of thickness on fracture toughness - stress intensity factors
for typical geometries.
UNIT IV FATIGUE DESIGN ANDTESTINIG 8
Safe life and Fail-safe design philosophies - Importance of Fracture Mechanics in
aerospace structures - Application to composite materials and structures.
UNIT V FUNDAMENTALS OF FAILURE ANALYSIS 8
Common causes of failure. Principles of failure analysis. Fracture mechanics approach
to failure problems. Techniques of failure analysis. Service failure mechanisms - ductile
and brittle fracture, fatigue fracture, wear failures, fretting failures, environment induced
failures, high temp. failure. Faulty heat treatment and design failures, processing failures
(forging, casting, machining etc.),
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
28
TEXT BOOKS
1. Prasanth Kumar – “Elements of fracture mechanics” – Wheeter publication, 1999.
2. Barrois W, Ripely, E.L., “Fatigue of aircraft structure”, Pe/gamon press. Oxford, 1983.
REFERENCES
1. Sin, C.G., “Mechanics of fracture” Vol. I, Sijthoff and w Noordhoff International
Publishing Co., Netherlands, 1989.
2. Knott, J.F., “Fundamentals of Fracture Mechanics”, Buterworth & Co., Ltd., London,
1983
3. Subra suresh, “Fatigue of materials” , II edition, 1998.
4. T. L. Anderson, “Fracture mechanics: Fundamentals and applications”, III edition,
2004.
AE2034 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I FORCE DEFLECTION PROPERTIES OF STRUCTURES 9
Constraints and Generalized coordinates-Virtual work and generalized forces-Force-
Deflection influence functions-stiffness and flexibility methods.
UNIT II PRINCIPLES OF DYNAMICS 9
Free and forced vibrations of systems with finite degrees of freedom-Damped
oscillations-D” Alembert’s principle-Hamilton’s principle-Lagrangean equations of motion
and applications.
UNIT III NATURAL MODES OF VIBRATION 9
Equation of motion for free vibrations solution of Eigen value problems-Normal
coordinates and orthogonality relations.
UNIT IV ENERGY METHODS 9
Rayleigh’s principle-Rayleigh-Ritz method-Coupled natural modes-Effect of rotary inertia
and shear on lateral vibrations of beams-Natural vibrations of plates.
UNIT V APPROXIMATE METHODS 9
Approximate methods of evaluating the Eigen frequencies and the dynamics response of
continuous systems-Matrix methods of dynamic stress analysis.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. F. S. Tse, I. E. Morse and H. T. Hinkle, “Mechanical Vibration”, Prentice Hall of India
Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 1988.
2. W. C. Hurty and M. F. Rubinstein, “Dynamics of Structures”, Prentice Hall of India
Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 1987.
REFERENCES:
1. R. K. Vierck, “Vibration Analysis” 2nd Edition, Thomas Y. Crowell & Co Harper & Row
Publishers, New York, U.S.A. 1989.
2. S. P. Timoshnko ad D. H. Young, “Vinration Problems in Engineering”, John Willey &
Sons Inc., 1984.
3. von Karman and A. Biot, “Mathematical Methods in Engineering”, McGraw-Hill Book
Co., New York, 1985.
29
AE2035 AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL AND PLANNING L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
To study the procedure of the formation of aerodrome and its design and air traffic
control.
UNIT I BASIC CONCEPTS 9
Objectives of ATS - Parts of ATC service – Scope and Provision of ATCs – VFR & IFR
operations – Classification of ATS air spaces – Varies kinds of separation – Altimeter
setting procedures – Establishment, designation and identification of units providing ATS
– Division of responsibility of control.
UNIT II AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES 9
Area control service, assignment of cruising levels minimum flight altitude ATS routes
and significant points – RNAV and RNP – Vertical, lateral and longitudinal separations
based on time / distance –ATC clearances – Flight plans – position report
UNIT III FLIGHT INFORMATION ALERTING SERVICES, COORDINATION,
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND RULES OF THE AIR 10
Radar service, Basic radar terminology – Identification procedures using primary /
secondary radar – performance checks – use of radar in area and approach control
services – assurance control and co-ordination between radar / non radar control –
emergencies – Flight information and advisory service – Alerting service – Co-ordination
and emergency procedures – Rules of the air.
UNIT IV AERODROME DATA, PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
AND OBSTACLE RESTRICTION 9
Aerodrome data - Basic terminology – Aerodrome reference code – Aerodrome
reference point – Aerodrome elevation – Aerodrome reference temperature – Instrument
runway, physical Characteristics; length of primary / secondary runway – Width of
runways – Minimum distance between parallel runways etc. – obstacles restriction.
UNIT V VISUAL AIDS FOR NAVIGATION, VISUAL AIDS FOR
DENOTING OBSTACLES EMERGENCY AND OTHER SERVICES 8
Visual aids for navigation Wind direction indicator – Landing direction indicator –
Location and characteristics of signal area – Markings, general requirements – Various
markings – Lights, general requirements – Aerodrome beacon, identification beacon –
Simple approach lighting system and various lighting systems – VASI & PAPI - Visual
aids for denoting obstacles; object to be marked and lighter – Emergency and other
services.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. AIP (India) Vol. I & II, “The English Book Store”, 17-1, Connaught Circus, New Delhi.
REFERENCES
1. “Aircraft Manual (India) Volume I”, latest Edition – The English Book Store, 17-1,
Connaught Circus, New Delhi.
2. “PANS – RAC – ICAO DOC 4444”, Latest Edition, The English Book Store, 17-1,
Connaught Circus, New Delhi.
30
AE2036 PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To understand the various components and functions of production planning and control
such as product planning, product scheduling and inventory control.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION: 8
Factors affecting planning-Forecasting information necessary for pre-planning-sources
of information-Methods of forecasting-aircraft components requiring overhaul-repairmodifications-
premature-failures-project planning-estimates of plant, machinery,
buildings, manpower, materials, spare parts, time, and cost estimates.
UNIT II MATERIALS, MACHINES AND PROCESSES: 9
Production engineering knowledge necessary for Planning, machine tools and
processes.-Materials including aircraft materials and their processing-Spare parts
required for overhaul and maintenance-Ground handling equipment-testing of
components and aircraft overhaul-standards for acceptance after overhaul.
UNIT III EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS: 10
Pre-planning required for provision of special tools, jigs, fixtures and test equipment
required for overhaul and maintenance-types and description of major test equipment.
UNIT IV PRODUCTION PLANNING: 10
Production planning function of routing, estimating and scheduling –LOB-CPM and
PERT. Queuing theory, sequencing in jobs, shop scheduling, assembly line balancingcharts
and graphs.
UNIT V PRODUCTION CONTROL: 8
Production control functions of dispatching, progressing and evaluation-Activities of
progressing-shop procedures-maintenance of critical data statistics of evaluation control
charts.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Thomas. L. “Production planning and control” Mc Graw Hill, 1985.
2. Jain. K. C. and Aggarwal. L. N. “Production planning and control and Industrial
Management, Khanna publishers, 1990.
REFERENCES:
1. Buffa. E. S. and Sarin. R. K. “Modern production / operations management”8th ed,
John Willey and sons, 2000.
2. MacNiece. E. H. “Production forecasting, planning and control”, John Willey, 1986.
3. Mages. J. F. “Production planning and Inventory control”, McGraw Hill, 1990.
31
AE 2037 ENGINE SYSTEM AND CONTROL L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE
 To give an exposure to the different systems in Aircraft Engines and the
methodologies as well as instruments used for engine controls & indication.
UNIT I ENGINE CONSTRUCTION 10
Layout – Piston Engine – Turbo Prop-Gas Turbine Engines – Modular concept. Oil
System – Fuel systems – Heat Management system of Gas Turbine Engines. Lubricants
and Fuel used – Engine Materials – Compressor, Turbine, Frames and Casting etc.
UNIT II ENGINE SYSTEMS 9
Air System and Pneumatics – Engine controls – FADEC Fire Protection System –
Ignition and Starting system – Engine Anti-icing system.
UNIT III MAINTENANCE & INSPECTION 6
Maintenance aspects of Gas Turbine Engines – Preventive condition (performance)
Monitoring – Boroscopic Inspection – On wing Trim Balance – Test bed overhaul.
UNIT IV CONTROL INSTRUMENTS 10
Engine sensors – Basic construction – Processing signals – Analog and Digital
Indication – Scaling – Monitoring of Instruments / Indicators.
UNIT V ENGINE INSTRUMENTS 10
Primary instruments – RPM, Fuel flow, Exhaust Gas Temperature, Thrust parameters –
Secondary Instruments – Vibration indicator, Oil Pressure and Oil Temperature indictor,
Nacelle Temp. Indicator.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Aircraft Instruments – E H J Pallett, Pitman & Co., 1993
2. Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Technology – Irwin E Treager, English Book Stores,
New Delhi
3. Aircraft Gas Turbine and Operation – PRATT AND WHITENY, United Technologies,
English Book Stores, New Delhi
REFERENCES
1. “General Hand Book of Airframe and Power Plant” US Department of Transportation,
FAA, English Book Stores, New Delhi
2. Turbo Mache of Gas Turbine, English Book Stores, New Delhi
3. Aircraft Gas Turbine Guide, P&W Publications, English Book Stores, New Delhi
4. Rolls Royce, The Jet Engine, Rolls Royce Ltd., III Edition, 1983

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